Newbury


Memorial

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ID:WB419
UKNIWM:0
Location:St Nicolas' Church
OS Map Ref:SU470670
Description:Litany desk
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Inscription:
“To the glory of God and in memory of those belonging to the Albert Works who gave their lives in the Great War, 1914-1918.”

Lieut. Philip Edward Buckingham, MC, 37th TMB, attached RAF, killed in action in France, November 8th, 1918;

Corpl. Frederick John Lake, Royal Engineers, attached Dorset Regiment, killed in action in Frqnce, February 27th, 1918;

Sapper Richard Smith, Royal Engineers, killed in action in France, February 17th, 1917;

Trooper Robert Taylor, Royal Berks Yeomanry, killed in action in France, November 11th, 1916;

Trooper Owen Robert Wyatt, Berks Yeomanry, attached 13th Worcester Regiment, killed in action in France, June 17th, 1917.

“Greater love hath no man than this.”


What the papers said:

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Elliott’s of Newbury, War Memorial – Dedication 24 May 1919

Newbury Weekly News, 29 May 1919

 

MEMORIAL SERVICE

 

An impressive service was held in St Nicholas’ Parish Church, on Saturday afternoon, in memory of men connected with the Albert Works, Newbury, who gave their lives in the Great War, and for the purpose of dedicating a Litany Desk, which had been presented to the church by the firm. The desk is a handsome specimen of handicraft, beautifully carved in oak, designed in Perpendicular style, and reproducing artistically the architectural features of the church, with which it is in perfect harmony. Brass shields on either side bear the inscriptions:-


“To the glory of God and in memory of those belonging to the Albert Works who gave their lives in the Great War, 1914-1918.”
Lieut. Philip Edward Buckingham, MC, 37th TMB, attached RAF, killed in action in France, November 8th, 1918;
Corpl. Frederick John Lake, Royal Engineers, attached Dorset Regiment, killed in action in Frqnce, February 27th, 1918;
Sapper Richard Smith, Royal Engineers, killed in action in France, February 17th, 1917;
Trooper Robert Taylor, Royal Berks Yeomanry, killed in action in France, November 11th, 1916;
Trooper Owen Robert Wyatt, Berks Yeomanry, attached 13th Worcester Regiment, killed in action in France, June 17th, 1917.
“Greater love hath no man than this.”


The desk was carved by Mr C Lowman. It was placed in position on Saturday afternoon, immediately in front of the chancel steps, and laid upon it was a wreath of laurel, tied with white satin ribbon, and the inscription: “Their name liveth for evermore.”
There was a large congregation, including Mr E Buckingham (managing director), Mrs Buckingham, Messrs Cecil and Horace Buckingham, relatives of the deceased men, and many of the employees at the Albert Works. Previous to the service, Mr J S Liddle, Mus Bac, played apporporiate music, including “Weep not for the glorious dead” (Mackenzie),, “Abide with me” (Parry), and Funeral March from Mendelssohn’s “Songs Without Words.” The service commenced with the hymn “Hark! The sound of holy voices.”


THE RECTOR’S ADDRESS


The Rector, in a short address, remarked it was hardly necessary to say anything on the occasion of such a service, the object of which sufficiently declared itself. There had been given to the glory of God and the solemn use of the House of God, a beautifully carved Litany desk from the Albert Works, inscribed with the names of those men from the Works who had given their lives as a sacrifice in the Great War. They were now met together, many of their fellow workers, to dedicate their gift to God and make a memorial of praise and prayer for those whose names were inscribed thereon. There were five – a small number in comparison with the Roll of Honour of that church, to whom they hoped later to erect a suitable memorial and hold a service. They were especially glad to welcome to their parish church the men, women and girls of the Albert Works, because they, in common with so many others, had contributed by their efforts to bring about a successful conclusion of the war. They were glad that they wished to join in this act of dedication, thereby marking their sense of that brotherhood and co-operation which had been shown so remarkably during the war throughout the British Empire. The ringing of the bells that morning reminded them that it was Empire Day, which was memorable, coming as it did at the close of over four years of war, during which all parts of the Empire had given its best in the sacred cause of humanity, in defence of all oppressed peoples, and in vindication of the principles of truth and justice. They had won, thanks to the sacrifice of many thousands of their best and most valuable lives, and from the bottom of their hearts they thanked them for all they had done and all they had suffered. Now it remained for them to prove themselves worthy of the supreme sacrifice made on their behalf, and all who were near and dear to them. These men and women had died so that they might live, and their sacrifice demanded that they should follow in their footsteps, so that the Empire might be nobler than ever it had been, an Empire where none were oppressed or down-trodden, where justice and right dealing should prevail between man and man, and where, above all, men would not be ashamed to acknowledge and worship the great God Himself. They were reminded by the cross that Christ by His sacrifice assured them would end in the victory of right and the establishment of God’s kingdom over the nations of the earth. That was why they were enlisted as soldiers of Christ, pledged to fight against all that is base and wrong, and in His strength to win the victory.


PRAYER AND PRAISE


The Rev E Thoyts recited the opening sentences of the Burial Service and read the lesson, Revelations xxi, 1-7, Psalm xxiii, “The Lord is my shepherd” was chanted, and the hymn sung “On the Resurrection morning.” The Rector continued the reading of portions of the Burial Service, with prayers. Then was sung “For all the saints,” and the Rector, taking the stand by the Litany desk, dedicated in “in the faith of Jesus Christ to the Glory of God, and in memory of His servants.” Prayers were offered, and then Mrs Clifford Phillips sang very sympathetically Handel’s beautiful air “I know that my Redeemer liveth.” After the Blessing from the altar there was a momentary silence, broken by two buglers of the Royal Berks Regiment, who sounded the “Last Post,” the solemn and pathetic strains thrilling the congregation. Then the rousing cries of the “Reveille,” with which a memorable service came to a conclusion.


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 Died this day:
24 June 1917
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